Tag Archives: healthy food

10 Health Benefits You Can Gain From Cassava (Jamaican Bammy)

What I did not know about Jamaican Bammy for instance it can help with weightloss and Migraines!

jamaican bammy 10 health benefits
What is Jamaican Bammy?

I have found myself looking back at some of the specially prepared dishes my granma and mum use to prepare to find out if there was any nutritional benefits to them or just trandition.

One of the dishes I remember was fried fish served with Bammy, I found it hard to chew but my grandad and dad seemed to enjoy it immencely.

So what is Bammy?

I found out that it is made from Cassava flour which is made from a root vegitable.

Cassava also call Manihot esculenta

Cassava or scientifically called Manihot esculenta is a type of vegetable root or tubers. Cassava is a food source that is rich in nutrients. Although there are not many devotees.

The carbohydrate content in the tuber is so high that it is third, after rice and corn. Because it has health benefits, cassava is a staple food in various developing countries.

A warning about the process

However, the wrong processing of cassava can reduce its nutritional value because vitamins, minerals, fiber, and starch tend to disappear when cooking.

Cassava in it’s raw state must be cooked properly before consumption, otherwise cassava can cause acute poisoning because of the naturally occurring cyanide content in the raw state.

If not prepared properly, tubers that are rich in carbohydrates can even cause paralysis or death.

With that said, I recommend it is better to buy the flour or flat bread instead of trying to make your own!

Nutrient content in cassava

The most effective way to maintain the health benefits of cassava and the nutritional value of cassava is to boil it.

The nutritional value of cassava for a dose of 100 grams of tuber contains 160 calories of energy, 0.3 g of fat, thiamine 0.087 mg, riboflavin 0.048 ml, niacin 0.854 mg, vitamin B6 0.088 mg, iron 0.27 mg, and zinc 0 , 34 mg

Other nutrients in cassava are as follows: 38.1g carbohydrates, 1.7g sugar, 1.8g food fiber, 1.4g protein, 60g water 27mcg folate 20.6mg vitamin C 16mg calcium 21mg magnesium 27mg phosphorus 271 potassium 14mg sodium.

10 Health Benefits Obtained

The health benefits of cassava are rich in calories, carbohydrates and iron as a good source of energy.

Incorporating cassava into a controlled healthy diet menu has turned out to have many positive effects on health. 

1. Cassava loses Your weight

Cassava which is rich in dietary fiber is the right choice if you can’t wait to lose weight.

Cassava can make you feel full for a longer period of time. Thus reducing the need to constantly snack on food so as to suppress weight gain.

2. Cassava cures migraines

The presence of vitamin B2 and riboflavin in tubers is useful for curing headaches and migraines. Eating cassava can help reduce constant migraine attacks.

The trick is to take 60 grams of roots or cassava leaves and soak them in water for 2 hours then make the juice. This will reduce the severity of your migraine.

3. Cassava improves digestive health

As mentioned above, cassava is rich in dietary fiber which is very beneficial for the body and its function.

Insoluble fiber helps in improving your digestive system by absorbing all the poisons stored in your intestine, and also by reducing inflammation in your digestive tract.

4. Cassava treats diarrhea

The antioxidant properties of the roots can help overcome flaccid stools.

If you suffer from diarrhea, boil the roots in water for one hour and consume them.

This will help to get rid of bacteria that cause stomach problems and reduce the symptoms of diarrhea as well.

5. Cassava improves vision

One of the other main benefits of cassava is that it is beneficial to your eye health.

Consumption of controlled cassava can help your body with the vitamins and minerals needed.

Filled with vitamin A content, cassava can help improve your vision, it can also prevent blindness or poor vision.

6. Cassava heals wounds

The whole cassava plant, namely the stems, leaves and roots are all useful in treating wounds.

Roots can help prevent wounds from becoming infected and speed healing.

7. Cassava cures fever

Cassava can be used to treat mild fever.

When boiled together with cassava leaves, it increases the ability to relieve fever. You can make potions from both of them and drink them to reduce your body temperature.

8. Cassava cleanses worms

Eating cassava can help relieve nematode lice in your stomach and intestines. Cassava roots help remove worms in your intestines and provide assistance.

9. Cassava increases appetite

Carbohydrates and fiber in cassava play an important role in regaining your appetite.

If you feel weak and have no appetite, maybe for emotional or physical reasons, try putting a few pieces of cassava into your menu.

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10. Cassava increases energy

Because cassava is rich in carbohydrates, edible tubers are very useful in instantly increasing your energy.

This helps improve the functioning of your brain and supplies energy.

How to cook Jamaican Bammy

Visit cooklikeajamican.com for more info

Preparation time 15m

Cooking time 15m

1 or 2 Packs of Jamaican Bammy

Jamaican Bammy is best described as a flat bread. It is traditionally eaten with Ackee and Saltfish,  Calaloo, steamed or fried fish.

There are two quick and easy ways to prepare bammy: Toasted in an oven or fried in hot oil. It’s a delicious gluten-free substitute for bread with your meal.

Instructions

1. Soaking: In a shallow dish soak 2 bammy in 1/2 cup of coconut milk or salted water. Pour half the liquid over bammy; flip bammy and pour the rest of the liquid; let stand for about 5 minutes. Note if you are using canned coconut milk dilute milk 50:50 with water

2. Toasting: Broil both sides of bammy until toasted. Cut open and spread inside with butter while still hot

3. Frying: Fry both sides of bammy in hot oil until golden brown. Cut in quarters

Great for Vegitarians

Vegetarian Recipe

• 1 packet(s) Grace Coconut Milk Powder

• 2 1/2 cup(s) water

• 2 stalk(s) escallion

• 3 clove(s) garlic

• 2 medium carrots

• 3 whole bammies

• 6 large okras

• 2 sprig(s) thyme

• 6 whole pimento berries

• 1 small green scotch bonnet pepper

• 1 packet(s) Grace Cock Soup Mix

Vegetarian Steamed Bammy Directions

• Rehydrate Grace Coconut Milk Powder with water and bring to a boil.

• Beat escallion, chop garlic, dice carrot, cut each bammy into 4 pieces and okras in halves.

• Add seasoning and carrots and steam for about 5 minutes then add bammies and okra.

• Sift in seasoning from the Grace Cock Soup Mix.

• Stir well, cover and steam for a further 10 minutes.

Where to buy online

This is what the pack looks like. There are 2 flatbreaded in each pack

Bammy (Cassava)

You can also shop on amazon.

Taking a look at food Fads and Trends by Diane Shawe

I dont often write about food, but when you think about it, it plays a major part in our daily life.

I researched and found some observations from the Compass Group UK & Ireland, the Food People who compile a list of the top 10 food trends we can expect to emerge or, in some cases, continue into next year.

Multi-cuisine restaurants

Serving up dishes that take inspiration from all sorts of exciting and international sources are coming to the fore at the same time as nano-specialists that pour all their energy into mastering single ingredients.

When you look at the world of food, you realise that food trends are really being driven by consumers and what they need and want.

The other point that’s important to consider is the difference between a trend and a fad, A fad is confined to one category, channel or geography and usually just lasts for one season or year.

A good way to spot trends that will stand the test of time is to identify the ones that have one or more wider social drivers, such as health and wellbeing, or seeking experiences that support them.”

BBQ 2.0
Different barbecue techniques inherited from around the world will become part of restaurant theatre, Consumers will continue to crave the charred and smoky flavours from a barbecue.

As we see more chefs and barbecue operators starting to think of the barbecue or fire as an incredibly versatile cooking method, rather than an institution confined by history we can expect this momentum to continue with alternatives
to meats, such as fish and game, vegetables, new cuisines and desserts from the barbecue.

Who’s doing it: Temper, London W1F

healthy-food

Global larder
As travel has become more affordable and technology ensures the world becomes better connected, the lines that divide regional fare have blurred.

Chefs and home cooks are growing, buying and cooking with ingredients more typical of exotic cuisines than with their own flare, forget about geographical barriers – flavour profiles from across the globe are being used in our kitchens, as consumers become more aware of the unusual flavour imparted by these world ingredients.

Who’s doing it: the Providores, London W1U

Multi-cuisine cooking
This is a food movement that is less about fusion and more about choice,

Quantity and quality are key, as influences and ingredients move from specific regional classics to global favourites, taking their seat at the world table.
Who’s doing it: Caravan, London N1C

Nano-specialism
This is almost the perfect counter-trend to multi-cuisine cooking, focusing as it does on expertise, excellence and the narrative.

“Now is the time to be a specialist in your field,” says Banks. “Make your food shine, showing it off to its best possible potential. These specialists are showcasing individual ingredients and creating surprising and delicious dishes with only one main ingredient.

“These nano-specialists are becoming masters of the humble avocado or bag of crisps, as boundaries are pushed and experimentation takes over.”

Who’s doing it: Yolk, London EC2M

Provenance
Consumers are more interested in where their food comes from than ever – from the breed to the farm and the farmer’s name. But why do they want so much information?

Gorgeous Group’s Bargh says: “In a world of consumer distrust, knowing the back story helps to create an element of trust and transparency between the consumer and the retailer, brand and chef, and gives consumers the ability to create a real emotional connection.”

Compass’s Davies agrees: “People seek honest stories they can trust in an uncertain world. It feels good to know who made your food or drink, where it comes from and how it was cared for.”
Who’s doing it: Lyles, London E1

Authenticity
Simon Parton, Compass Group UK & Ireland’s head of food and beverage innovation, says: “Authenticity is a delicate balance. At the very top level, it means total authenticity of the recipe and the ingredients. This is expensive, so to most of us authenticity means capturing the essence of the cuisine, the flavours, the key ingredients, the colours and smells; not breaking the rules by using the wrong meat, for instance.”
Who’s doing it: Hill & Szrok, London E8

Veg-centric cooking
Meat-free dining has become a lifestyle choice for today’s health-conscious and environmentally aware consumers and it’s one that they’re choosing to dip in and out of.

“Veg-centric cooking is a trend that’s been bubbling away for a while,” says Nick Vadis, culinary director at Compass Group UK & Ireland. “That’s why we’ve developed our new vegetarian Root Kitchen concept for the business. But the people asking for it are not necessarily vegetarian.”

Vadis describes this group as ‘flexitarian’, while the Food People refers to them as ‘reducetarians’.

“This isn’t about being perfect, it’s about moderation of our carnivorous side,” says Banks. “Reducing any processes that harm the planet and finding cleaner ways to live and eat is better for our bodies and better for the world.”
Who’s doing it: Root, Bristol

Waste not, want not
The arguments for reducing waste are so compelling, for both the planet (less waste to landfill; conservation of natural resources) and hospitality operators (reduced costs), that the real question should be why not?

So it’s little wonder that food businesses are becoming increasingly innovative when it comes to lowering the levels of waste they produce.

“Restaurants are promoting themselves as having ‘no food waste’, using not only nose-to-tail but also root-to-tip [of fruit and vegetable]. Never before has so much of every plant and animal been used,” says Banks.

“There are a few operators that are responding to the desire from consumers to live within a sustainable food ecosystem. And it is extremely difficult to do if it is done properly. To quote Doug McMaster from Silo: ‘I don’t have a bin in my kitchen.’ Just think about that for a moment. Nothing is thrown away – no food, no packaging, nothing. That would completely change how a kitchen operates. He admits it’s very difficult, but it does mean you get very creative.”
Who’s doing it: Silo, Brighton

Craft carbs
We can kiss goodbye to ‘plastic white bread’, says the Food People, as the craft of bread baking returns and a trend for artisan, flavoured and luxury loaves emerges.

Of course, craft carbs go well beyond bread, as Banks explains: “Forget about cheap and cheerful, carbs have taken on a luxurious edge, elevating their position from midweek staple to fine dining. Fresh, authentic pasta made with finely milled ancient grains, or bright, vibrant tagliatelle coloured with vegetables.”
Who’s doing it: Trullo, London N1

tacos

Food by occasion…
… rather than food by type because, says Bargh: “Consumers are choosing to eat according to their mood, rather than the nationality of the food.”

This means, for example, that diners are looking for dishes that can provide a kick-start to their day, rather than food that is typically associated with breakfast. Banks says this is a trend that is particularly prevalent in the health space, but from an operator’s perspective, it’s not necessarily an easy appetite to satisfy: “The challenge is getting consumers to understand and articulate what they want at a more functional level.”
Who’s doing it: Detox Kitchen, London (various locations)

Food on the go
The grab-and-go food trend is expected to evolve in 2018 and it’s an opportunity not to be missed by hospitality businesses. The market was valued at £20.1b in 2016, with robust consumer demand for quick and quality food leading to substantial growth and no signs of it slowing down.

“On-the-go is the buzzword driving this trend,” says Parton. “We are all busy people – the average lunch in the UK is only 34 minutes – so we insist on eating on the go. Research we conducted found the sandwich has remained the favoured lunchtime choice, chosen by 63% of the UK workforce. We’ve done a massive amount of work to make sure we’re leading the way in delicious and convenient food. ‘On the go’ must not mean we compromise on quality and enjoyment.”
Who’s doing it: Pret a Manger/Leon, various locations

Whilst I agreed with some of the findings I was not overly surprises. The UK is becoming one big cultural melting pot, but you would think the only place this is happening is London.

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